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  • Posts by Nathaniel L. Story
    Posts by Nathaniel L. Story

    Nate fully engages in each case and shoulders his clients’ needs. Communication, efficiency and careful judgment define his practice. In every case, he investigates competing claims to thoroughly understand their strengths ...

As states and localities update their responses to the COVID-19 pandemic on a daily basis, some states have issued “stay at home” orders, or orders closing all “non-essential” businesses. This blog post provides readers with key takeaways on the applicability of these orders to construction.

On March 18, 2020, the President signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”). This new legislation contains a number of components designed to address the current COVID-19 pandemic, but two aspects of the FFCRA related to emergency sick leave and emergency family and medical leave will be of immediate concern to many employers. Below are answers to key questions for private employers about the FFCRA leave requirements. For specific applications of these new requirements to your workforce, when in doubt, consult experienced counsel.

In the ever-changing environment of the COVID-19 pandemic, OSHA is offering new guidance for employers relating to workplace safety and reporting requirements. This post provides readers with key takeaways from the new guidance.

We discuss how the coronavirus is impacting the construction industry and steps to address these impacts from a contractual basis.

Posted in Contracts, Payment

In an article published on Tuesday, February 25, 2020, for Contractor Magazine, Kelly Bundy and Liz Burneson discuss the enforceability of pay-if-paid provisions, alternatives to those provisions, and tips for subcontractors faced with these provisions during the contract negotiation stage and throughout the course of a project.

According to Kelly and Liz, the enforceability of pay-if-paid provisions varies by state. Subcontractors should pay attention to what law applies for each project and whether pay-if-paid provisions are enforceable in that jurisdiction. Kelly and ...

We have previously reported on two bills that would have repealed Right to Work in full (HB153, Del. Lee Carter) and in part (SB426, Sen. Richard Saslaw). Both of these bills have failed in the General Assembly and will not become law. HB153 failed to pass the House Appropriations committee when that committee refused to schedule a vote on the bill before Crossover, the date by which all House bills must be heard in the House (and all Senate bills must be heard by the Senate). The Senate Bill was passed by indefinitely in the Senate Commerce and Labor committee, which means the bill will not be taken up by the Senate before crossover. 

Posted in Legislation

The Virginia Senate Judiciary Committee, in a rare showing of bipartisan support, voted unanimously 13-0 on Wednesday night (February 5, 2020) to advance the new “state contract statute of limitations” bill to the Senate Finance Committee for further review and approval. This follows unanimous (and bipartisan) approval of a substantially similar companion bill on Monday afternoon (February 3, 2020) by the House of Delegates Courts of Justice Civil Subcommittee. The House bill will also go to the House Finance Committee for review and approval.

The Senate bill, which is ...

Before this year’s General Assembly Session we wrote about two companion bills that would create a statute of limitations on claims made by the Commonwealth of Virginia on construction and design contracts for state projects. 

Yesterday, in a victory for the Virginia construction and design industries, the House of Delegates bill passed, on a bipartisan and unanimous basis, out of the House Courts of Justice Civil Subcommittee, over opposition voiced by the Virginia Department of General Services (DGS), the Governor’s Office, and VDOT.

On January 12, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced a final rule to revise—and narrow—the definition of “joint employer” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Whether or not a company is a joint employer is a question that contractors who use staffing agencies, franchise businesses, and firms that outsource services should be asking themselves. In recent years, a growing number of Americans have found themselves in these types of work arrangements. A contractor or franchisor who is determined to be a joint employer can end up on the hook for wages that were ...

The Virginia Department of General Services has issued its General Assembly-mandated report on current Virginia law regarding state construction contracts and the freedom that the Commonwealth currently enjoys from any statutory time limitation on the state’s ability to bring claims against its contractors. 

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