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We have previously reported on two bills that would have repealed Right to Work in full (HB153, Del. Lee Carter) and in part (SB426, Sen. Richard Saslaw). Both of these bills have failed in the General Assembly and will not become law. HB153 failed to pass the House Appropriations committee when that committee refused to schedule a vote on the bill before Crossover, the date by which all House bills must be heard in the House (and all Senate bills must be heard by the Senate). The Senate Bill was passed by indefinitely in the Senate Commerce and Labor committee, which means the bill will not be taken up by the Senate before crossover. 

On January 12, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced a final rule to revise—and narrow—the definition of “joint employer” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Whether or not a company is a joint employer is a question that contractors who use staffing agencies, franchise businesses, and firms that outsource services should be asking themselves. In recent years, a growing number of Americans have found themselves in these types of work arrangements. A contractor or franchisor who is determined to be a joint employer can end up on the hook for wages that were ...

As Democrats have now taken control of Virginia’s legislature, legislators and pundits have begun to debate repealing Virginia’s Right to Work law.  Delegate Lee Carter of Manassas has filed a bill that would repeal Right to Work, House Bill 153. What is Right to Work and what could a repeal of the law mean for you?

Construction industry professionals faced a number of challenges in 2019—chief among them a persistent labor shortage. 2020 promises to bring similar challenges to the construction industry. Below we identify six trends we expect to carry forward into the new year.

2018 was a strong year for the construction industry. Despite a labor shortage and some uncertainty regarding material costs, construction professionals remain optimistic that the trend of growth will continue in 2019. Below we identify eight trends we expect to carry forward into the new year. 

This year’s Virginia General Assembly Session is for the most part complete and, as usual, Virginia lawmakers addressed (in some cases unsuccessfully) multiple construction industry issues. Here is a rundown of the House and Senate bills that passed and will become new law as of July 1. A few bills that did not pass and some that might live to be the subject of debate later this year or in next year’s Session are also included.

Posted in Employment, Tax

One-third of Virginia’s business owners may be misclassifying employees as independent contractors. How can you avoid this same mistake?

Many businesses rely on professionals and laborers retained and assigned through staffing agencies. In a decision released yesterday, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that insurance coverage for the negligent acts of those borrowed employees turns on the language of the insurance policy at issue, not the terms of the staffing agreement between the staffing agency and its client.

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